Photo: OneSubsea

Subsea Integration Alliance to deliver boosting system for Gulf of Mexico field

Subsea Integration Alliance partners OneSubsea and Subsea 7 have secured an engineering, procurement, construction and installation (EPCI) contract with Kosmos Energy to deliver an integrated subsea boosting system for the Odd Job field in the Gulf of Mexico.

OneSubsea, Schlumberger’s subsea technologies, production and processing systems business, will supply a subsea multiphase boosting system, topside equipment, and a 16-mile integrated power and control umbilical.

Project management, engineering, assembly and testing will be performed at the company’s facilities in Bergen and Horsøy, Norway, while Subsea 7 will carry out the transport to the field and installation.

According to the alliance partners, the system will be tied back to the existing facility, therefore achieving significant cost and energy savings, as well as reducing CO2 emissions, all while improving Kosmos Energy’s ultimate recovery.

“This contract recognizes the successful alliance model that brings together Subsea 7’s extensive track record in delivery of large-scale EPCI projects, with OneSubsea’s subsea processing technology leadership,” said Olivier Blaringhem, Subsea Integration Alliance CEO.

“Our alliance will improve Kosmos’ field economics while lowering complexity, cost and risk to achieve production objectives safely, on time and within cost targets.”

Kosmos Energy is the operator of Odd Job, located in Mississippi Canyon Blocks 214/215, with a 54.9% interest.

The U.S. company entered the field through the acquisition of Gulf of Mexico operator Deep Gulf Energy (DGE) in September 2018.

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A month ago, Subsea 7 and Schlumberger signed an agreement to renew the Subsea Integration Alliance for a further seven years and continue to jointly develop subsea solutions for deepwater developments.

The parties claim that the alliance has proven to be a “tremendous” success having been awarded 12 integrated projects and more than 130 early engineering studies around the world.