NKT performs remediation work at 12-year-old Irish Sea interconnector

NKT performs remediation work at 12-year-old Irish Sea interconnector

Denmark’s NKT has completed inspection survey and remediation work on an interconnector that has been linking the electricity transmission grids of Ireland and Great Britain for twelve years.

Source: NKT

The specialized inspection and remediation work on the East West HVDC interconnector (EWIC) allows the owner EirGrid Interconnector Designated Activity Company (EIDAC), a subsidiary of Irish transmission system operator (TSO) EirGrid Group, to ensure that the cable is brought back to optimal conditions.

“We are pleased to announce that both the inspection survey and remediation work following the survey are now successfully completed. The inspection survey led to remediation work being done for EIDAC, using our vessel NKT Victoria,” said Axel Barnekow Widmark, Executive Vice President, Service at NKT.

“EIDAC is a long-standing partner to NKT, and the long-term service agreement is a testament to the strong collaboration between our companies to jointly optimize performance of their interconnector.”

According to NKT, conducting periodic cable inspection surveys ensures that the cable can withstand extreme conditions and perform safe operations.

The survey of the East West interconnector, including characterization of seabed conditions along the cable, led to concrete mattresses and rock bags being placed above exposed sections. The work is part of a long-term service agreement between the two companies.

“As the interconnector is a critical piece of infrastructure between Ireland and Great Britain it is essential that it is maintained in an optimal condition. The recent survey showed the necessity of remediation work on sections of the cable. These works are now complete ensuring the continuity of supply between Ireland and Great Britain,” said EirGrid’s Chief Operations Officer Rodney Doyle.

EWIC, which has a power rating of 500 MW, links the electricity transmission grids of Ireland and Great Britain from converter stations at Portan in Ireland to Shotton in Wales.

The interconnector is 262 kilometers long, 186 kilometers of which is beneath the Irish Sea, and has been in commercial operation since December 2012.