Photo: Image: Ulstein

Ulstein converts Heerema’s ‘Aegir’ to offshore heavy lift vessel

Norwegian shipbuilder and designer Ulstein has completed the conversion of Heerema’s deepwater construction vessel Aegir to a dedicated offshore heavy lift vessel.

Aegir; Image: Ulstein

The Aegir joined the Heerema fleet back in 2013 as a deepwater construction vessel featuring J-lay and Reel-Lay capabilities via a large moonpool.

Equipped with a large heavy lift crane, it was the first vessel to use a portable reel system, saving time that is typically taken by sailing back and forth to a shore base.

Ulstein said on Thursday that the vessel was now converted into a dedicated offshore heavy lift vessel.

According to the company, Aegir’s already massive 4,000-ton main crane and the fact that the hull design is based on Ulstein’s SOC 5000 heavy-lift vessel design, is a key benefit in this development.

As Ko Stroo, project manager and lead naval architect at Ulstein, said: “It is not just simply removing the tower and lay equipment that turns Aegir into a heavy lift vessel. The obvious areas of attention are the closing of the large moonpool, creating a flush main deck and modifications to marine, ballast and venting systems.

“Furthermore, Ulstein is also performing CFD analysis to assess if hull optimization could reduce fuel consumption and emissions for the new operational profile of the vessel.

“A comprehensive and sometimes rather complex engineering scope, where experience, creativity, and open communication provides for pleasant and effective cooperation between Heerema and Ulstein.”

The vessel was built at the DSME shipyard in South Korea, where the construction started in August 2011. After final outfitting on the lay system in Rotterdam in spring 2013, the vessel started work for Heerema.

Aegir is 211.5 meters long DP3 vessel. The main 4,000-tonne crane has a radius between 17 and 40 meters and is equipped with a deepwater lowering system to reach a water depth of 3,500 metres. The ship accommodates up to 305 persons, and has a transit speed of 12 knots.


Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email.

Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.

Related news

List of related news articles