Photo: Triton-C wave energy converter (Courtesy of Oscilla Power)

Oscilla Power’s Triton-C wave energy converter reaches Hawaii

The Triton-C wave energy converter, developed by U.S.-based marine energy company Oscilla Power, has arrived to Hawaii ahead of its upcoming deployment.

Photo showing the Triton-C wave energy converter (Courtesy of Oscilla Power)
Triton-C wave energy converter (Courtesy of Oscilla Power)

The 100kW-rated device took two weeks to transport from Seattle to Hawaii using Aloha Marine Lines barge, following its launch that took place at the end of September.

The Triton-C will be installed at the U.S. Navy’s Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) site, a pre-permitted location that includes all required infrastructure, such as the subsea grid connection and moorings.

Beforehand, the Triton-C’s float will be lowered into the water with a crane, and towed to Honolulu Harbor where the reaction ring will be assembled and attached to the float to create the completed system, according to Oscilla Power.

The company will then wait for an appropriate weather window to tow the Triton-C around the island to the northeast shore where it will be installed at the WETS site, which is run by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) and the U.S. Navy.

Photo showing Triton-C onboard Aloha Marine Lines barge (Courtesy of Oscilla Power)
Triton-C onboard Aloha Marine Lines barge (Courtesy of Oscilla Power)

Triton technology uses a multi-mode point absorber approach to generating energy from the waves.

The device consists of a geometrically optimized surface float connected to a ring-shaped, vertically asymmetric heave plate.

The surface float is said to be able to extract energy from ocean waves in all six degrees of freedom, allowing for increased energy capture across a wider range of ocean conditions.

While the Triton-C is designed to produce 100kW in energetic West coast waves, the waves at the Hawaii site are about half the rated level due to a milder climate.

In addition, the test site is physically constrained to only allow 30kW to the grid, enough to provide power for about 25 houses, Oscilla Power said earlier.